Best Android Apps For Improving Your Finances

This week I was pleased to find out that I had won a Google Nexus 7 tablet from a contest over on CoupleMoney.com. I had entered Elle’s contest not expecting to win anything, but when I did it was a pleasant surprise – especially since I had won another tablet through another contest she had run a while back. Apparently I’m extremely lucky in Elle’s contests, or at least I just gained more entries by constantly tweeting and sharing the contest!

Since I’ll be receiving the Nexus 7 tablet in the mail soon I thought it would be a good time to do a quick post talking about some of my favorite financial apps for the Android platform.

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I’ve already been using quite a few financial apps on my Kindle Fire – which runs on the Android platform as well. I’ll be transferring a bunch of those apps over to the new Google tablet before handing the Fire off to my wife.

best financial android apps

Best Android Money Apps

If you go to the Google Play store you’ll find no shortage of financial apps. There are hundreds of apps to choose from, everything from budgeting apps, to mortgage calculators to debt snowball apps.

Wading through the apps trying to find what you’re looking for can be daunting, but there are quite a few apps that are head and shoulders above the rest, so here are my top 7 that I’ve used on my Android devices.

You Need A Budget 4 App

ynab4 app

ynab mobile app budgetOne of my all time favorite financial software is the You Need A Budget 4 desktop budgeting and financial management software.

With the recent launch of YNAB 4, apps for iOS and Android were released as well. The apps allow you to sync up with your desktop software, check your budget on the go, enter all your financial transactions and stay on top of your overall financial situation.

I can honestly say that the YNAB 4 Android app is the financial app that I use the most, almost on a daily basis. I use it to check balances in my accounts, enter receipts when I’m on the go, and just stay on top of what we’re spending every month.

The YNAB app is truly a great app, and I would recommend it to everyone. The only caveat is that the app only functions if you also have the desktop version of the software as well, it is not a standalone app. Keep that in mind, but if you do buy the desktop version, you won’t be sorry. It is one of the best budgeting software available in my opinion.

Here’s a video review I did of the app a short while ago.

Mint.com App

mint app

mint app screen

I’ve been using the Mint.com website for several years now. It’s a great place to put all of your financial accounts and keep track of them all in one place. The site offers great budgeting and tracking mechanisms, bill reminders and even some basic options for you to stay on top of your investments.

Mint also offers an Android app that is a great way to stay on top of your money, wherever you are. It was honored as the “best mobile personal finance tool” by Lifehacker earlier this year, and a must have money app by Kiplinger Personal Finance.

It allows you to look at your budgets that you’ve set up on the website, look at transaction data and account balances for all your accounts, view cash flow reports as well as advice and alerts based off of your spending. It does a lot, and is a great tool for any person’s financial tool-set. Check out our full Mint.com review here.

Personal Capital App

personal-capital

I’ve been using the Personal Capital website for a while now, and it’s quickly becoming one of my favorite online money management tools. It’s very similar personal-capital-appto Mint.com in that it allows you to track all of our financial accouunts in one place, but it has more of an emphasis on investments, and staying on top of your retirement account.

The Personal Capital suite of apps are also among the very best that I’ve seen. Simply stated, they’re beautiful. Not only do you get all of your financial information in one place, but it is presented with beautiful charts, graphs and interfaces that make it one of my new go-to apps.

If budgeting is your thing, then Mint.com may have some better options for you. But if you’re looking for more information about your invesments, check out the website and apps for Personal Capital.

Check out our full Personal Capital review here.

Credit Sesame App

credit sesame app

credit sesame screenIt’s important to stay on top of your credit, and one way to do that is by checking your free credit score with sites like Credit Sesame. Credit Sesame’s mobile app allows you to do several things to stay on top of your credit situation including allowing you to check your Experian credit score every month, checking your total debts, viewing your home’s updated market value, as well as giving you advice on how you can save money by refinancing, getting lower rates on credit cards and more.

The Credit Sesame app is simple and easy to use – and it can be one part of staying on top of your credit situation.

Read out full Credit Sesame app review here, or our review of Credit Sesame website.

Pageonce App

pageonce app

pageonce screenPageonce is another financial management app that is used by millions of people, and has been touted as one of the best financial apps in the market by Google, and the “Cadillac of money management apps” by CNN Money.

The app will allow you to organize & track your cash, stay on top of your credit card balances, track bills and investments, and even do bill-pay from within the app!

Definitely a cool app to check out and give a try.

Capital One 360 App

capital-one-app

I’ve been using CapitalOne360 as one of my online savings accounts for years now, and because of that I thought I’d also highlight their Android app that checkmate appwas released a while back. The app allows you to do a lot of things like check your account balances, find fee free ATMs, move money between accounts, schedule and pay bills as well as my favorite – doing remote deposit of checks.

I’ve used the remote deposit feature quite a few times using my Android phone, and it works like a charm. Just snap photos of the front and back of your checks, and you’re set to go! As a blogger who gets all sorts of checks in the mail, I can’t tell you how much time this has saved me! There are other banks that are offering this feature as well, like Chase, but I still prefer my CapitalOne 360 account!

Manilla App

manilla app

manilla app screenI did a site review of Manilla.com a while back and talked about how it’s a great site for helping you to keep track of and stay on top of all your regular bills, subscriptions, reward programs and services. Basically you enter in all your regular bills into the system, provide logins for those services, and then Manilla will download your account information and any bills and statements that the service has for you. It then gives you bill reminders, a nice calendar of what is coming due, and even provides free document storage for all your statements – indefinitely, until you cancel the service.

I’ve found the document storage part of the service especially valuable lately when trying to track down some old charges on my Dish Network account. Instead of having to go through the papers in the filing cabinet, I just downloaded the document I needed directly from Manilla.

The Manilla Android app allows you to do pretty much everything that you can do on the website, now on the mobile app. You can do everything from peruse when your bills are coming due, to downloading .PDFs of your recent statements. Find the app and signup for Manilla.com here.

Financial Apps Can Make Your Life Easier

For me the main reason I like to use these apps on my Android phone and tablets is because they make my life easier. They allow me to stay on top of my account balances, remind me of when my bills are due, and help me to keep track of how we’re doing when it comes to our budget, our credit and our savings.

Have your own must use apps for Android (or even iOS?). Tell us what they are in the comments!

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Last Edited: 11th October 2013

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Comments

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  1. says

    Peter, congrats on winning the contest from Elle. I was hoping I’d have a new mobile device but that’s okay… at least it will go to someone who takes time to review mobile money managing apps for us :) I’ll keep your reviews in mind if and when I get a mobile device lol.

    • says

      Mint is my go-to app and website for quick glances at how we’re doing, where our balances are, etc. I’m not in love with their budgeting mechanisms, but I think for a lot of folks they’re probably better than what they’re already doing. For budgeting we prefer YNAB. Both tools have their purpose, and I use them both on a regular basis.

  2. says

    Do all of these require the aggregation of your account data and passwords in one spot, presumably on their servers? This is my biggest obstacle to web budgeting.

    I don’t see a subscribe to comments so perhaps you could email me the answer?

    • says

      Well, let’s see, I think they’re all pretty secure, but let’s look:

      YNAB4 – you don’t enter account usernames and passwords, to download data you’ll need to login to your bank site, and download the transaction data and import. You can set pin-access to enter the app, so no one can get in if they don’t know your pass.

      Mint – Pin access to the app. You do enter all of your login details for your banks, but it has read only access, and your information is encrypted. Bank level security.

      Adaptu – same as Mint, read only access, and encrypted login data, bank level security.

      Manilla.com – bank level security and encrypted data.

      Credit Sesame – once again, bank level security, secure servers, encrypted data. Also the app has pin access.

      Pageonce – bank level security, encrypted data.

      As you can see they are all engaging in pretty careful security precautions and you can find out all the details with a quick google search. Personally I’m comfortable using them, but as with anything, if you’re uncomfortable – it’s a personal preference and I can understand people wanting to be safe rather than sorry. I hear identity theft/etc can be a bear to clean up.

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